Skip to content Skip to sidebar Skip to footer

MG Astor Review: MG Astor drives in to shake up the segment |


NEW DELHI: Just when you thought Kia Seltos and Hyundai Creta looked unmatchable, the industry conspires to put up a brave fight. In the last three months, MG Astor is the third C-segment SUV and it packs a handful of segment-exclusive features that will put the above-mentioned names in bother.
Hello Astor! And the personal assistant powered by AI will update you with news and weather inputs, freshen up your mood with jokes and music on the go. This very personal space inside the Astor can be configured in three colour upholstery. The level of fit and finish exudes richness. The driver’s seat is electrically adjustable and if need be, the cabin will lighten up your mood, all thanks to a slick 10.25-inch touchscreen and the segment-largest panoramic sunroof.

08:13MG Astor | Autonomous level-2 features

MG Astor | Autonomous level-2 features

Nitpick, you observe the absence of seat ventilation, auto-dimming inside mirrors and wireless charging. No bars are held when it comes to enveloping the SUV with a safety blanket. Astor is unprecedented, loaded with technology advanced greater than the Gloster: Introducing the Level-2 autonomous driving assistance system.
The radar-based system unlocks features like adaptive cruise control, lane assist system, emergency brake assistance and reverse assistance. These, along with up to 6 airbags, ESC, hill assists, ABS with EBD and more seamlessly come together to offer peace of mind. The cherry on the icing is the 5-star rating, which Astor’s namesake ZS, scored in crash test.

In simpler terms, Astor is a replica of the ZS EV running on a petrol powertrain. The design story isn’t loud and Astor stands in the crowd with less pretense. It’s dimensionally longer and wider than the Creta, Seltos but doesn’t appear so to the naked eyes. That’s largely because of the segment-shortest wheelbase and dropping bonnet. This, however, does no harm to the aesthetics. The concentric treatment, termed as celestial, to the grille in chrome finish draws a hint of futuristic touch alongside 17-inch diamond-cut alloy wheels and boomerang-shaped adaptive LED headlamps. These, obviously, would be a part of the range-topping trims of Astor. The tail lamps also communicate a similar level of attention to detail as the front.
Astor liberates a personal space, as mentioned above as well, is due to the humble knee room and thigh support you feel due to the lowest wheelbase. That said, the recline of the seat, cushioning and overall comfort will not bother.

Drive experience:
We put 15-odd laps in Astor around Buddh International Circuit, which is all possibilities will not be the case with owners. The 1.3-litre turbo-petrol engine, though not the most output generating, was surprisingly fun to drive.
The 140 horses are sent out the front axle and the engine feels relatively unhurried when pushed to the red line. It would be interesting to note the characteristic in start-stop city traffic, however, the first impression suggests linear power delivery from 1,700 rpm. The 6-speed automatic transmission briskly changes gears when driven leisurely. Using the paddle shifters or switching it to the sport mode, that extra oomph out of the Astor is well within the reach.
No drive modes to toggle between, but MG has played smart with the electronic steering programme, which alters the weight of the wheel as per the driver’s preference. The handling is decently sporty, needless to say it’s the best MG we have driven here yet. What could be a bit of an issue is the lumpy ride quality, showing clear signs to attain sportiness over laidback drive. To a great extent, the Astor, in my books, will suit the needs for a family of energetic youth than a case where you wish to travel your parents in it.

Dual disc brake setup offers ample stopping power, and the feedback on the lever feels consistent as well. I’m looking for the 1.5-litre naturally-aspirated petrol engine, which may well be the hot-selling variant of Astor.
Should Creta, Seltos be worried? Well, if MG puts a very competitive price tag on the top variant, the SX and GT Line of the corresponding Korean models will be put to test. Also, Astor will appeal more to young, working individuals over outright family buyers, who would seek the combination of cutting-edge tech and sporty drive over just practicality.





Source link

What's your reaction?
0Smile0Angry0LOL0Sad0Love

Add Comment

0.0/5